‘Insane’ plan to add two extra storeys to York flats thrown out

Plans to add two extra storeys to a block of flats have been refused by City of York Council.

Homeowners living in Sandringham Court next to White Cross Rehabilitation Hospital hit out at the scheme, calling it “slightly insane”.

There are currently six apartments in the three-storey building – but developer NW Architects applied for permission to add two extra floors and four further flats.

The council received 35 letters objecting to the scheme.

Planning officers at the council have now turned the application down, saying: “The proposed five storey building with flat roof would be significantly taller and monolithic in form and scale in comparison to other buildings in the locality.”

They say most buildings in the area are two storeys tall and the proposed extension would dominate the neighbourhood and be out of character. They add that it could also block daylight in nearby homes.

The developer was not planning to add extra parking spaces – but said a bike locker would be installed.

Susceptible to crime

Planning officers said: “The application proposes cycle lockers in front of the host building in an open, exposed location and at the expense of the small amount of amenity space allocated to the building.

“This arrangement is considered to be unacceptable in terms of having an adverse effect on the amenity of existing residents and providing storage that would be susceptible to crime.”

Developers claimed in their application that the plans would “not affect any protected views,” adding: “The site is in a very sustainable location.

“Due to the distance from surrounding properties there will be minimal impact on the existing and neighbouring properties.”

But a number of neighbours objected to the plans – with one resident saying they find it “outrageous” that extra floors could be built on top of flats owned by the people who live in them.

Another wrote that they bought their flat assuming the building was complete, adding: “I’m not a property lawyer … but this seems a slightly insane proposition. The level of disruption would be intolerable.”